Best Bread in Norway

posted Nov 1, 2016, 10:50 AM by Sam Johnson   [ updated Nov 1, 2016, 10:58 AM ]
Wednesday, 26 Oct. 2016

   I LOVE Norwegian bread!
   Have I mentioned that before?
   Ever since I first tasted it in 1968 on my premier trip "til gamle Norge," I have been on a search to find a comparable loaf in the U.S.....and have failed. There is simply nothing like Norwegian bread in the U.S.! 
   But here in Norway, my search has been to find the very same tasty bread I enjoyed those many years ago...and it has NOT been easy!
   In fact, it has been problematic since I couldn't remember the name of that special bread ... and there are SO MANY varieties of bread commonly carried in the grocery stores!
   I have been treating my taste buds to 
Grovbrød, Speltbrød, Fjellbrød, Skogbrød, Landbrød, Birkebeinerbrød, Åkehbrød and 
Kneippbrød along with many other hearty wheat and rye breads of Norway. 
   But after almost 3 months living here and sampling loaf after loaf of delicious bread, I think I have finally found that tasty toast I have long been looking for!
   And it's the ubiquitous 
Kneippbrød!  
   Actually, that's not surprising as this is the most popular bread in Norway, and the one most commonly baked and sold in stores throughout Norway, Scandinavia, and indeed Europe!
   In fact, according to the international agency FEDIMA that tracks bread consumption, more th
an 60 million fresh loaves of Kneippbrød are sold every year in Norway, helping to make this country the largest consumer of bread in Europe!
   It's an interesting story Kneippbrød, named after the 19th century Bavarian priest and natural doctor, Sabastian Kniepp who is credited with creating the special recipe for it. His bread was brought to Norway in 1895 and officially licensed by Baker Hansen, which helped make it the most popular bread in Norway!
   What makes it so special? I'm not sure, but most tell me it is the special wheat used in the recipe and the way it is ground, which cannot be duplicated in the U.S.
   At any rate, my problem now is how to ship and store a couple ton of it back home!







Comments